David and Tracy

Meet David and Tracy

Tracy started her foster care journey in 1996. She was working for a foster care licensing agency at the time and felt to be the most effective in her position she had to “walk the walk” not just talk the talk.

Starting as a single adult with no children, she opened up her home to sixty-eight children. (Not all at the same time). Most of the children she took in were newborns to the age of six, many with special needs. She loved seeing the growth in these children. She also found it rewarding to work with the biological parents towards a successful reunification when possible. In February of 2015 she married her now husband, David. She had 13 children at the time and they are in the process of adopting twins.

Foster care has many challenges. For Tracy, some of them have been dealing with the bureaucracy and turnover of caseworkers. “Foster parents are sometimes considered less of a team member when it comes to sharing pertinent case information. We are not just the foster parent, we are the foster parent. Key word parent, everyday all day,” Tracy says.

“Kids will come and go, and that is the plan. Foster care is not adoption. Chances are you will be able to adopt one of your placements. But you must be prepared to lose ten before one might stay.” When asked “How do you let them go?” Tracy responds with “They were not mine to begin with.”

Foster care is not for everyone but there is a huge need for good homes and welcoming families. Too many children are in shelters or group homes. Tracy was willing to open her heart and her home to many children. She may not be saving the world but to the kids she has cared for she is saving their world! Thanks for Cultivating Goodness Tracy!

 

Meet David and Tracy.

 

Tracy started her foster care journey in 1996. She was working for a foster care licensing agency at the time and felt to be the most effective in her position she had to “walk the walk” not just talk the talk.

 

Starting as a single adult with no children, she opened up her home to sixty-eight children. (Not all at the same time). Most of the children she took in were newborns to the age of six, many with special needs. She loved seeing the growth in these children. She also found it rewarding to work with the biological parents towards a successful reunification when possible. In February of 2015 she married her now husband, David. She had 13 children at the time and they are in the process of adopting twins.

 

Foster care has many challenges. For Tracy, some of them have been dealing with the bureaucracy and turnover of caseworkers. “Foster parents are sometimes considered less of a team member when it comes to sharing pertinent case information. We are not just the foster parent, we are the foster parent. Key word parent, everyday all day,” Tracy says.

 

Kids will come and go, and that is the plan. Foster care is not adoption. Chances are you will be able to adopt one of your placements. But you must be prepared to lose ten before one might stay.” When asked “How do you let them go?” Tracy responds with “They were not mine to begin with.”

 

Foster care is not for everyone but there is a huge need for good homes and welcoming families. Too many children are in shelters or group homes. Tracy was willing to open her heart and her home to many children. She may not be saving the world but to the kids she has cared for she is saving their world! Thanks for Cultivating Goodness Tracy!

 

If you are interested in becoming a foster parent or helping foster children please visit aask-az.org for more information.